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Classic Rock Licks! New Lesson Series

Classic Rock Licks! New Lesson Series

Coming June 1, we are excited to announce a new mountain dulcimer series:

Classic Rock Licks on the Classic Mountain Dulcimer, taught by Steve Eulberg.

Using a standard mountain dulcimer, exploring famous licks and riffs from Classic Rock music, Steve finds and demonstrates the ones that need no extra frets, the ones that require a 6+ or a 1+ fret, and those that sound terrific with some string bending.

Subscribe and you’ll have access to all of these lessons.  There are 15 to begin with, with more in the filming queue.

If you are already a subscriber, tune in on June 1st when they go live!

 

 

 

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New Mountain Dulcimer Instructor

New Mountain Dulcimer Instructor

by Steve Eulberg

We are pleased to welcome Berkeley Dulcimer Gathering Director and Freight and Salvage Dulcimer Teacher, Deborah (DJ) Hamouris, to our roster of instructors at DulcimerCrossing.

Deborah introduces herself here:

Deborah joins our faculty of 15 respected and gifted instructors of mountain and hammered dulcimer and fiddle.

We are filming and editing his lessons and they will be available for all subscribers on dulcimercrossing.com.

Subscribe and you’ll have unlimited access to all of her lessons, and those of all of our instructors!

 

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Live Event Highlight!

Live Event Highlight!

by Steve Eulberg

In January, dulcimercrossing instructors, Steve Eulberg and Erin Mae Lewis, teamed up for a Live Event for dulcimercrossing.com at the home of Abby Knaub and family in Lakewood, Colorado.

Here is a highlight from the end of the concert:

Basic Members have access to these live events every quarter, Premium Members have access to them on a monthly basis.

Subscribe to DulcimerCrossing.com and you’ll have access, too!

 

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New Hammered Dulcimer Teacher

New Hammered Dulcimer Teacher

by Steve Eulberg

We are pleased to welcome 2012 National Hammered Dulcimer Champion, Matthew Dickerson, to our roster of instructors at DulcimerCrossing.

Matthew introduces himself here:

Matthew joins our faculty of 15 respected and gifted instructors of mountain and hammered dulcimer and fiddle.

We are filming and editing his lessons and they will be available for all subscribers on dulcimercrossing.com.

Subscribe and you’ll have unlimited access to all of his lessons, and those of all of our instructors!

 

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Make a Goal

Make a Goal

by Linda Ratcliff

Goals in writing are dreams with deadlines.
– Unknown

Make a Goal List in Your Journal … Every Week

My husband and I recently moved in with my daughter and her family about 4 weeks ago (there are now 7 of us at the dinner table), and she donated her formal dining room for me to set up as my music room.  I LOVE it.  I have all my instruments set up within easy reach.   And as soon as everyone is out of the house, I usually pick up my hammers and practice for a while.

 

But I just noticed something today about the way I have been practicing lately. I am simply playing whatever comes to my mind, rather than selecting tunes with a particular goal or result in mind.

I know better. When I took piano lessons, I had a spiral steno pad (how many of you remember those?).  My goals (aka assignments) were written down for the week, for the month, for the end-of-the-year recital.  I knew what I needed to practice for the next lesson, for the next month, and when I needed to have a piece ready to play in public.  
 

The Bible says, “Write the vision and make it plain on tablets, that he may run who reads it” (Habakkuk 2:2).  So I have turned over a new leaf.  I pulled out a new journal, and dedicated it to my music practice time. I drew lines horizontally across the page, dividing it into these five sections.

  • Warm-up Exercises:  Even though I am an experienced player, I need to consistently review the hammering drills in our Hammering Skills section, so I don’t get rusty.
  • Old-Time Jammin’ Tunes:  I find I like old-time hymns the best, and tend to play something like “It Is Well With My Soul,” or “What a Friend We Have in Jesus” when I have a moment to practice. But I have neglected to practice the old-time jammin’ tunes like “Old Joe Clark” and “Golden Slippers” regularly.  I scheduled 2 of those for review this week. 
  • Something New: I noticed I haven’t challenged myself with a new genre lately. So I decided to work on expanding my Celtic tunes repertoire. This week, I assigned myself Caledonian Club and Dorsett’s 4-Hand Reel.
  • Free Exploration: This is something we don’t do often enough.  This is how you will expand your musical vocabulary and see greater potential with your instrument.  Take something familiar and try new rhythms, new chord progressions, or add new embellishments to the melody.
  • A Good ‘Ole Favorite:  To close your practice, you should randomly play something you really enjoy.  Have fun with your instrument, and end your practice time on a positive note.

A good work-out like this would take me an hour, because I entered TWO things in my journal for each category. I think I might have been overly optimistic. I don’t usually have an hour, and you probably don’t either.  Next week I may just give myself just one assignment per category and see how that goes. 

 
As always, if you have any questions, please feel free to ask Steve or myself.
 

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New Lessons for MD & HD Players

New Lessons for MD & HD Players

by Linda Ratcliff

I am still learning.
– Michelangelo at age 87

New Lessons for MD & HD Players

We have two new lessons at Dulcimer Crossing to offer our hammered dulcimer and mountain dulcimer players.

Peek-A-Boo Waltz for HD, taught by Steve Eulberg

The Peek-A-Boo Waltz is a tune that traveled with the pioneers taking the westward trails going through Kansas City toward the new world. In this video, Steve demonstrates the embellished version of the melody. 

Peek-A-Boo Waltz

Asika Thali for MD, taught by Neal Hellman
Asika Thali is a song of freedom from South Africa, taught by Neal Hellman. Neal likes to play this tune on a dulcimer with 4 equi-distant strings tuned to D-A-dd, but it can also be played on a dulcimer with 3 strings in the D-A-d tuning.

Neal Hellman
BUT … is it time to learn something new???

New or old?

This is what many of us wonder about.  You’ve been working hard on a new tune, and you’re fairly far along with it. But it’s not perfect yet.  You still get hung up on Part B, the second line. You’re tired of working on it, but you hate to move on until you’ve mastered it.So how do you know when to hold ’em and when to fold ’em? Well, I believe that even if you feel completely confident with a piece, it doesn’t mean you should just set it aside. As soon as you’ve mastered a good part of a tune, feel free to go ahead and start another. You’ll still be practicing the old one because, when you practice, you always dedicate some time to warm-up, some time to reviewing old tunes, and some time to practicing new tunes.  It’s a balancing act, and I know you can do it.

As always, if you have any questions, please feel free to ask Steve or myself.

Happy dulcimering,
Linda
 

More Backing Tracks for Premium Members!

More Backing Tracks for Premium Members!

by Steve Eulberg

We continue to add to the Backing Tracks Library on DulcimerCrossing.com.  We now have 60 special tracks in this collection.

BacktrackingTracksP2

This library is sortable by all of the categories at the top of the list and all of the blue text are links to support using each track.

Not familiar with Backing Tracks and how to use them?  Here is an introduction I filmed:

Premium Members have access to all the Backing Tracks all the time!  Sign up or Upgrade today!

 

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