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Is the Mixolydian Mode a Major Mode?

30 Oct
Is the Mixolydian Mode a Major Mode?

by Steve Eulberg

Dan Evans, English-dulcimer.com, recently explored this question from his own experience, and posed the question to (3) other professional musicians/scholars of his acquaintance and shared their responses and his conclusions in his blog.

Dan is both a fingerstyle guitarist and a fingerstyle mountain dulcimer player.

Dan plays a standard mountain dulcimer with no 6+ fret.

As you can see here, this is an important question because his instruments do not have a 6+ fret. The only way for him to play the “major” (Ionian Mode) scale is to play between 3-10 on the melody string. When he starts at “0” and plays to “7”, he’ll hear the Mixolydian Mode (which has a flatted 7th step.) Sometimes this note is called the “Old Joe Clark” note because that tune requires that interval and note.

As Dan concludes, the binary, either-or, categories of Major or Minor simply are NOT descriptive enough when talking about songs, scales, modes or music. We must have (or “get to have”) a broader frame of reference in order to experience the music we love to play in its delicious complexity and beauty.

Click on the links above to read Dan’s blog post and then let us know what YOU think.

 

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One response to “Is the Mixolydian Mode a Major Mode?

  1. Nancy

    October 30, 2019 at 11:38 pm

    This was really interesting. I’m picking up bits of music theory as I go along and this post helped me to better understand where modes fit in (or don’t fit in). I loved the thought that the harmonic minor scale sounds “Egyptian”. I guess it does. I’m now motivated to go and play a few and see what feeling I get from them, rather than listen to whether each note is in tune. Thanks for posting this.

     

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